Covid-19 scam warning

Today, we have been alerted to a highly believable scam which starts with a text and advises the user that they are eligible to apply for the vaccine and to click on the link in the text message.  The user is then led to a webpage, which looks very convincing and asks them to complete some details, in order for them to be able to apply for the vaccine.

The details asked for:

  • Name
  • Address
  • Date of birth
  • Proof of address
  • Card payment details

With the recent approval of multiple vaccines in the UK, these types of scam attempts are likely to continue, as fraudsters continue to take advantage of the rollout to some many people.

Please see our article on our website: 

https://www.ourwatch.org.uk/news/fake-text-identifying-you-eligible-covid-19-vaccine

supporting our older generation

There are a number of scams, which are meant to intimitate older persons as they are considered more vulnerable to some scams. Often living more isolated can lead to being more receptive to phone calls and demands made via email or phone.

Do you get emails telling you, that you have to pay extra for TV license, missed deliveries, which need extra payment, offers of money into your bank account? Do you get phone callls that threaten your arrest unless you press a reply button immediately and pay a sum of money?

Do you feel unsafe when going to shops, chemists? We can give tips on how to make every-day chores safer for you.

We would love to invite all members of our community to courses – in small groups – to talk about

  • how scams affect us and how we can put safety nets in place not to fall for them.
  • how to spot scam emails
  • what to do when worried
  • how to shop safer

Please get in touch with Parkview Neighbourhood Watch or the Tenants and Residents Association to arrange sessions that suit you.

New Unity doors

Let me thank all the operatives who work very hard to instal the new doors for all THH tenants and those opting to have them installed.

Whilst I now have first-hand experience of the new door, I must make recommendations to all who also have had them installed or plan to have them installed.

The doors comply with the latest national Firesafety regulations. Please see a data-sheet enclosed.

The doors have a more secure lock and key, the latter looks distinctly different from the previous standard type Yale key.

I would like to recommend that you lock your door with your key each time you leave your dwelling, even for a short time. The door remains open unless it is locked either from the inside or the outside.

The automated closing with the latch will only bring across bolts, but they do not lock the door, even if it sounds like your door is shut, it is not.

If you share your dwelling with others and those remaining inside whilst you leave cannot immediately lock the door from the inside, you are strongly advised to lock the door from the outside every time you leave as – if the person/s remaining inside cannot secure the door when you leave, – the door remains open.

It is similar to a car. You would never leave your car door open. I suppose it would invalidate a home burglary insurance if you failed to lock your door, even for a short while and then somebody enters your dwelling without your permission.

take care when shopping online

Black Friday is coming along and what you need to be aware of is:

  • Be selective where you shop
  • only provide necessary information
  • use secure, protected payment
  • keep your accounts secure
  • beware of unexpected communication

If things go wrong, contact your bank immediately and report the problem to Action Fraud https://www.actionfraud.police.uk or ring them on 0300 123 2040

Community Safety Partnership Plan CSP

Each local Council has a statutory obligation to have a Community Safety Partnership (CSP) which must tackle crime and disorder, substance misuse and reoffending. As part of this, each CSP must develop a plan that addresses these issues in partnership with representatives from the Police, NHS Trusts, Probation and the Community Rehabilitation Company (CRC).

The current CSP plan and priorities expires on March 31st 2021. We are consulting with both professionals and local residents to ensure we develop a new plan that takes into consideration the concerns of local people and changes they would like to see.  

Please let us know by sharing and completing our survey by Friday 27th November 2020.

August crime figures

Crime figures at the moment look good, there are only 2 recorded crimes in the immediate area. Compare this to the larger area. This is most likely due to the recent lock-down. Let’s hope the low crime stays that way.

All should have received the latest leaflet by now if you have not received it, please look on the newsletter page, where there is a copy for downloading.

Best advice for ASB and crime solutions

forest bike bulls
Photo by Philipp M on Pexels.com

“Police have asked anyone who has had a bike stolen in Hackney or Tower Hamlets in the past 6 months…to email CE-MiST@met.police.uk with as much information about the bike as possible. (Make, model, colour and/or serial number, and a picture if available.)”

Follow Tower Hamlets Neighbourhood Watch on Twitter. https://twitter.com/thnwa

Latest Advice on how to deal with ASB and crime. Follow simple steps to report and achieve results. https://towerhamletsneighbourhoodwatch.wordpress.com/2020/08/08/getting-results/

 

 

There’s safety in neighbours

As lockdown eases in the UK, we’re expecting a rise in burglaries. Neighbourhood Watch partnered with the Home Office to create a new social media campaign to help keep people safe and continue the great work our schemes are already doing.

We need your help
Please help us spread the word and share the campaign on your local social media pages and chat groups.

  • Visit our campaign page
  • Watch our campaign video
  • Download our campaign social media pack
  • Share using #SafetyinNeighbours in the caption
  • Tag Neighbourhood Watch in the post
    • Facebook: @ourwatch
    • Twitter: @N_watch
    • Instagram: @neighbourhood.watch.insta

NW-safety-in-neighbours

Covid-19 related scam advice

Criminals are exploiting the COVID-19 pandemic to try and get their hands on your money and personal information. To date, Action Fraud has received reports from 2,378 victims of Coronavirus-related scams, with the total losses reaching over £7 million.
How you can protect yourself from Coronavirus-related scams:
There are some simple steps you can take that will protect you from the most common Coronavirus-related scams. Here’s what need to do:

1 – Watch out for scam messages
Your bank, or other official organisations, won’t ask you to share personal information over email or text. If you receive an email you’re not quite sure about, forward it to the Suspicious Email Reporting Service (SERS): report@phishing.gov.uk

2 – Shopping online
If you’re making a purchase from a company or person you don’t know and trust, carry out some research first, for example, by checking to see if others have used the site and what their experience was. If you decide to go ahead with the purchase, use a credit card if you have one, other payment providers may not provide the same protection.

3 – Unsolicited calls and browser pop-ups offering tech support
Never install any software, or grant remote access to your computer, as a result of a cold call. Remember, legitimate organisations would never contact you out of the blue to ask for financial details such as your PIN or full banking password.

NHS Test and Trace scams:

The NHS Test and Trace service plays an important role in the fight against coronavirus and it’s vital the public have confidence and trust in the service. However, we understand the concerns people have about the opportunity for criminals to commit scams.

What you need to know:

Contact tracers will only call you from the number 0300 013 5000. Anyone who does not wish to talk over the phone can request the NHS Test and Trace service to send an email or text instead, inviting them to log into the web-based service.

All text or emails sent by NHS Test and Trace will ask people to sign into the contact tracing website and will provide you with a unique reference number. We would advise people to type the web address https://contact-tracing.phe.gov.uk directly into their browser, followed by the unique reference number given to you, rather than clicking on any link provided in the message.

The NHS Test and Trace service will never:

  • ask you to dial a premium rate number to speak to them (for example, those starting 09 or 087)
  • ask you to make any form of payment or purchase a product or any kind
  • ask for any details about your bank account
  • ask for your social media identities or login details, or those of your contacts
  • ask you for any passwords or PINs, or ask you to set up any passwords or PINs over the phone
  • ask you to download any software to your PC or ask you to hand over control of your PC, smartphone or tablet to anyone else
  • ask you to access any website that does not belong to the government or NHS

If you think you have been a victim of fraud, please report it to Action Fraud at https://www.actionfraud.police.uk or by calling 0300 123 2040. If you live in Scotland, please report directly to Police Scotland by calling 101.​​​​​​​

Be tech savvy

I strongly encourage our residents to make the most of our new technology to stay and in touch and connect. Use email, apps and the Internet to stay informed.

But Cyber crime is on the rise. I want to give some advice:

  • Never click on links you receive from unknown contacts or sources via SMS, email, or messenger applications such as Skype or WhatsApp. Even if you think you know the sender, take a closer look at the sender’s address and the link itself. If anything looks odd, steer clear. Malicious links are one of the most common ways to distribute malware.
  • Don’t click on adverts that seem too good to be true. An ad offering you something abnormally great, is likely to be a scam
  • Use strong passwords for all your online accounts, something only you could know. Use a mixture of symbols, numbers, upper and lower cases and aim for 10 to 15 characters in length. If this seems daunting, try using a reputable password manager or random password generator to help.

There is a good online course we all can do free of charge to help us determine the issue.

Please visit the Cyberhood Watch page for more advice on how to keep yourself, your loved ones and your communities safe: https://www.avast.com/uk-cyberhood#pc