Water fountains in greater London

The nearest free water fountain for us will be in Mare Street Hackney, the map shows where they are planned or installed already.

Leaf blowers

man in white tank top and blue denim pants with leaf blower outdoors during daytime

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

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Leaf blowers are fatal to insects and should not be used unless absolutely necessary, the German government has told citizens, days after a disturbing new report warned than an ongoing “insect armageddon” threatens all life on Earth.

brown paved road under blue sky

Photo by Avelino Calvar Martinez on Pexels.com

A report from a top UK ecologist, published last week, warned bugs are dying out eight times faster than larger animals, with 40 per cent of the roughly one million known insect species facing extinction as a result.

“If insect declines are not halted, terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems will collapse, with profound consequences for human wellbeing,” Professor Dave Goulson’s report for the Wiltshire Wildlife Trust concluded.

The dangers posed by leaf blowers hinted at a larger trend that could be harming insect populations, according to Dr Edward Turner, a lecturer at the University of Cambridge’s zoology department and curator of insects at the university’s zoology museum.

“I think that leaf blowers fall into the category of being ‘too tidy’ and this can be very bad for insects,” Dr Turner told The Independent.

“Really importantly … We should limit our use of herbicides and insecticides to an absolute minimum, especially in our urban green spaces and gardens.

“Basically, I think we just need to be a little less tidy and a little more tolerant of ‘weeds’ and I think insects and therefore lots of other species would benefit.”

Source article MSN

private balconies

chillie-peppers

Chillie, sweet peppers and Squash plants, to grow on our balconies

Again we are being asked to clear all our belongings from our private balconies because the landlord wants to paint the railings yet again. They have recently been painted and I could not find a fault with the work.

Yet, letters have gone around Rosebery House to clear all the balconies. How are we supposed to establish a planting regime on our private balconies to take part in Tower Hamlets in Bloom if we have to clear our balconies every two years? One competition category is best balcony! It can take a couple of seasons for plants to establish and they often need to be undisturbed to develop at their best.

It’s more than unreasonable and flies in the face of our green agenda, whereby we want to establish bee and bug friendly planting? The BBC Springwatch and Autumnwatch programs encouraged us to create bug friendly environments and feed birds.

Tower Hamlets even hosted the London in Bloom Awards 2019.

I completely accept that our balconies need to be clean and free of combustible and other clutter, especially if they are community balconies but personal balconies are a personal space to relax in and grow personal produce.

I shall be raising the issue with the Councillor.

Liveable streets Bethnal Green

Tower Hamlets Council Liveable Streets program currently consults on Bethnal Green. Plans include traffic stopping measures for Old Bethnal Green Road and Columbia Street Market.

Bethnal Green livable streets

Visit the consultation website for interactive content.

Please fill in the online survey and come speak with us at one of our drop-in events:

When:
•Saturday 9 November, 10am to 12noon
•Thursday 14 November, 5pm to 7pm

Venue: Professional Development Centre
229 Bethnal Green Road, London E2 6AB

You can also email us at: liveablestreets@towerhamlets.gov.uk

Bee-friendly planting

gardeners

The Parkview gardening Volunteers prepare a lawn area for mixed natural habitat planting.

Our gardening volunteers were out this morning, in the pouring rain, to prepare areas for planting with bee and bug friendly plants.

The environmental impact of mixed planting is more beneficial than just grassy lawns, mowed regularly. Creating an environmentally friendly area, with better root systems, require less watering.

Often grass lawns require regular watering to look good, which is something we cannot maintain with water-shortages looming each year.

Alternative planting will create a busy multi-planted environment that also attracts bees and butterflies. It establishes root systems, needing less watering. The carbon footprint of natural lawn is better than plain grass lawns.

Many multi-storey business in central London have established bee hives on the top of their buildings. There are bee hives on the roof top of London’s Law Building in Russell Square and the Museum of London and the Lloyds Building have bee hives on their roof tops.

Hopefully we can have a beehive on Parkview in the spring.